How to Hang a Coat Rack on Drywall?


A coat rack is a cheap and easy way to de-clutter any entrance or foyer. Instead of piling up coats on the back of a chair, or hanging them inside a closet, a coat rack gives you the option to hang up coats where they’re easy to access.

When hanging a coat rack in drywall you’ll need to consider how you’ll anchor it securely. Simply driving screws directly into drywall won’t give you a secure hold, as the threads have nothing to grip onto, resulting in a screw that will tear out of the wall at the slightest bit of pressure.

Luckily, installing a coat rack is a simple job that anyone can accomplish with just a few basic tools and a little planning. Let’s look at how to hang a coat rack on drywall in step-by-step detail.

Tools & Materials

How to Hang a Coat Rack on Drywall – Guide

Step 1: Measure and Mark Rack Location

First up, you’ll want to mark out the location where you want to mount your coat rack. Typically about 5 feet high is a good spot to shoot for as it’s tall enough to keep your coat off the ground and short enough that just about anyone can reach it.

A note about fasteners:
As you plan out the installation location, you’ll want to also consider what type of fasteners you’re going to use. If you want a coat rack with maximum durability and weight capacity, then you’ll want to drive the fasteners into the studs behind the drywall.

If that sounds like you, then you’ll want to use a stud finder to locate the studs and mark their location with your pencil. However, this isn’t necessary for lighter coat racks that won’t be subject to heavy loads. These coat racks can be installed using drywall screws with anchors or toggle bolts.

Hold up your coat rack against the wall and use your level to ensure its leveled correctly. Then mark the corners of the rack with your pencil.

Step 2: Mark Fastener Locations

Next up, you’ll want to mark the locations of the fasteners you plan to use to mount the coat rack.

This step will differ depending on the design of the coat rack. Some coat racks have predrilled holes that go all the way through the body of the coat rack. Others (like mine) have holes only on the back of the rack, which is used to hang the rack from your fasteners.

In my case, each coat rack needs three drywall screws. I measured and marked their locations on the wall with a pencil.

If you’re going to be mounting your fasteners into studs, then consider that studs are typically 16 inches apart. Use your stud finder to locate the studs, and make a slight marking with your pencil at the stud locations.

using a stud finder
Using a stud finder to locate the studs.

Depending on the dimensions of your coat rack and the location of the pre-drilled holes, you may not be able to drive screws into multiple studs. In that case, try to drive your middle fastener into the stud and use anchors on the ends.

Step 3: Pre-Drill Pilot Holes

After you mark out the fastener locations, use your drill to create pilot holes in the locations you just marked. I used a ¼” drill bit to create the holes for the drywall anchors, as this was recommended by the manufacturer.

drilling pilot hole
Drilling pilot holes.

It’s a good idea to use your level once again to ensure the pilot holes are lined up correctly.

Step 4: Secure Drywall Anchors

At this point, I used a screwdriver to drive the plastic drywall anchors into the wall. Don’t use a drill for this as it’s easy to overdrive the anchors and break them.

Them, I drove the drywall screws into the anchors using a drill. In my case, I left the end of the screws protruding  ¼” from the wall, as per the manufacturer’s directions.

Step 5: Hang the Coat Rack

At this point, you’ll want to hand the coat rack on the protruding screws. If everything was done right in the previous steps then the rack should slide into place secure and level against the wall.

Give the rack a little test by putting some weight on it to ensure it’s secured properly. If it’s not level or secured properly, you can still install it in the same location by sliding over an inch or so and drilling new holes.


Denis Gardner

I've loved tinkering and fixing things for as long as I can remember. So, naturally, I gravitated towards DIY and home improvement when I bought my first home. Nowadays you can find me writing about my passions or messing around with my newest tool!

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